A biomechanical analysis of the one-handed backhand groundstroke
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A biomechanical analysis of the one-handed backhand groundstroke

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Published .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Tennis -- Physiological aspects,
  • Human mechanics

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Linda D. Pecore.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination72 leaves
Number of Pages72
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13597076M
OCLC/WorldCa6212191

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A biomechanical analysis of the one-handed backhand groundstroke. File(s) pecorelindapdf (Mb) Date These Ss were filmed at a rate of fps while executing the one-handed backhand groundstroke. The following data were described after analysis of the film: flexion of the elbow joint at the completion of the backswing and Cited by: 1. Matching subject-specific computer simulations of a typical topspin/slice one-handed backhand groundstroke performed by an elite tennis player were done . (a-f) One-handed backhand groundstroke-(a-c) illustrates the preparation phase of a 1-handed closed stance backhand, while (d-f) illustrates the forward swing. +3 Medicine ball deep groundstroke.   Ray J.D. () The biomechanical analysis of the one-handed and two-handed backstroke in tennis. In: Proceedings of XIII ISBS Symposium, Ontario, Canada, July Book of Abstract Reid M. () Biomechanics of the one and two-handed backhands. ITF Coaching and Sport Science Review 9 (24), Cited by: 7.

Knudson, D., and Blackwell, J., , Upper extremity angular kinematics of the one-handed backhand drive in tennis players with and without tennis elbow, Int. Cited by: The backhand Velocity generation • One handed backhand is a multi-segmental (5) stroke • Two handed stroke: – Earlier work suggested that involved a bi-segmental co-ordination (hip rotation followed by trunk-limb-racquet segment rotation) – Joint rotation at the hips, shoulders, elbows and wrists shows that it is also multi-segmentalFile Size: KB. Abstract. Groundstrokes are the predominant strokes in tennis, outnumbering serves by a factor of almost 2. While the volume of groundstrokes is typically double for men compared with those of women, the similarity in velocity generation for forehands and backhands, irrespective of sex, means that a biomechanical base to groundstroke production is critical in attaining optimal performance and Author: Bruce Elliott, Machar Reid, David Whiteside.   The aim of this study was to present kinematics of trunk and upper extremities in tennis players who perform one-handed and two-handed backhand strokes. The study aimed to address the question of whether one of those techniques has some important advantage over the by: 9.

  In part 3 of conversations with Colin, we go a bit deeper into how we can build tennis technique based on biomechanics. If you missed the previous parts, jump first to part 1, where we discuss the main purpose of improving technique and why we must always have a clear intention.. In part 2, we start discovering how the body’s natural biomechanics need to be the foundation of tennis . The two-handed backhand is a three-segment sequence (hips and trunk / upper arms and hands) as opposed to the five-segment sequence of one handed backhands (hips, trunk, upper arm, forearm and hand). All things being equal, the kinetic chain is virtually the same for both types of backhands and should be observed as such.   Introduction. The backhand and the forehand are the two groundstrokes in tennis. Although the forehand may be considered the most important stroke behind the serve in the modern game (Brabenec, ), the evolution of the backhand (BH) represents one of the biggest changes in tennis over the past three , where the one-handed backhand (1BH) was almost . • After a warm-up and practice period, participants performed at least 30 flat one-handed backhand strokes down the center of a mock-tennis court with a machine-projected ball at typical rally speeds. •Data was collected on muscle activation at the wrist and elbow and the motion path of the racquet during the backhand stroke. File Size: 83KB.